Rock Valley College

Resources & Forms

Forms for Early College Programs

Dual Credit at RVC

Home-Schooled Students


Resources for Transitioning to College

  • Teacher/ Student Contact – In high school, contact is closer & more frequent (5 days/week). In college, faculty are available during office hours (only a few hours a week) and by appointment to address students’ concerns.
  • Competition/ Grades – In high school, academic competition is not as strong; good grades can often be obtained with minimum effort. In college, academic competition is much stronger; minimum effort may produce poor grades.
  • Status – In high school, students establish a personal status in academic and social activities based on family and community factors. In college, students can build their status as they wish; high school status can be repeated or changed.
  • Counseling/ Dependence – In high school, students can rely on parents, teachers, and counselors to help make decisions and give good advice. Students must abide by their parents’ boundaries and restrictions. In college, students rely on themselves; they see the results of making their own decisions. It is their responsibility to seek advice as needed. Students set their own restrictions.
  • Motivation – In high school, students get motivation to achieve or participate from parents, teachers, and counselors. In college, students apply their own motivation to their work and activities as they wish.
  • Freedom – In high school, students have limited freedom. Parents will often help students out of a crisis should one arise. In college, students have much more freedom. Students must accept responsibility for their own actions.
  • Distractions – In high school, there are distractions from school, but these are partially controlled by school and home. In college, the opportunity for more distractions exists. Time management will become more important for students.
  • Value Judgments – In high school, students often make value judgments based on parental values; thus, many of their value judgments are made for them. In college, students have the opportunity to see the world through their own eyes and develop their own opinions and values.
  • Assistance for Students with Disabilities – In high school, students with IEPs or 504 Plans receive tutoring and study support as a service of their Plan. In college, tutoring DOES NOT fall under Disability Support Services and modifications/ accommodations are NOT transferred from the high school to college. Students with disabilities must initiate contact with Disability Support Services to discuss resources available to them or seek tutoring on their own.
  • Instructor Freedom – In high school, teachers are given a set curriculum but may modify the curriculum and/ or pace of assignments; modify grading. In college, instructors are NOT required to teach material uniformly nor are they required to alter assignment grading or deadlines.

Applicable Laws

High School

  • IDEA 2004 (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act)
  • Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973
  • Intention of IDEA is educational success

College

  • ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, Title II)
  • Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973
  • Intention of ADA is equal access

Documentation

High School

  • IEP (Individual Education Plan) and/or 504 Plan
  • School district pays evaluation expenses
  • Eligibility by IDEA category

College

  • Documentation must be current and relevant and must clearly explain the diagnosis, specific functional limitations, and demonstrate the need for specific accommodations
  • Student pays evaluation expenses

Student Role

High School

  • Student identified by the school
  • Primary responsibility for arranging accommodations belongs to school
  • Teachers approach you if they believe you need assistance

College

  • Student self identifies to the DSS office
  • Student has primary responsibility for self-advocacy and arranging accommodations
  • Professors expect students to seek help if needed

Parental Role

High School

  • Parent has access to student records and can participate in accommodation process
  • Parent advocates for student

College

  • Parent does not have access to student records without written consent from student
  • Student advocates for self

Instruction

High School

  • 25-­­30 hours a week in the classroom
  • Emphasis on in class learning is primary, while independent reading and study is limited.
  • Learning is teacher focused
  • Teachers may modify or alter curriculum and/or pace of assignments
  • Reading assignments are short
  • Teachers direct students step by step with frequent reminders
  • Expectation of limited volume of writing while still learning writing process.

College

  • 12-­­15 hours a week in the classroom
  • Emphasis on independent reading and study time.
  • Learning is student centered
  • Instructors not required to modify design or alter assignment deadlines
  • Substantial reading assignments and out of class research/study
  • Expectation of frequent independent review of class notes, text and research
  • Expectation of substantial volume of proficient writing

Tests

High School

  • IEP or 504 plan may include modifications to test format and/or grading
  • Testing is frequent and covers small quantity of material
  • Teachers often take time to remind you of due dates and assignments

College

  • Grading and test format changes are generally not available. Accommodations to HOW tests are given are available (extended time, reader, breaks without study)
  • Testing often infrequent, covers large amounts of material and may be cumulative.
  • Makeup tests frequently not an option

Grades

High School

  • Many assignments and tests are offered and no one assignment carries major course weight
  • Teachers frequently go over grades, due dates and expectations

College

  • There may be very few assignments and each assignment may carry significant weight in the final grade.
  • Long term assignments common
  • Students expected to read, save and consult the course syllabus; Faculty give very little in the way of reminders.

Study Responsibilities & Student Expectations

High School

  • Tutoring and study support may be a service provided as part of an IEP or 504 plan
  • Time and assignments are structured by others.
  • Daily schedule generally follows a consistent routine.
  • Study expectations may be as little as 0-­­2 hours a week and is generally last-minute test preparation.
  • Students are not expected to learn or study information beyond what is covered in class and assigned.
  • Assimilation of information is generally provided by the teacher and often provided in a consolidated review or study guide
  • Function with tremendous structure, guidance and specific proscribed direction

College

  • Tutoring DOES NOT fall under Disability Services. All students have a variety of academic tutoring opportunities available.  Individual tutoring is not provided.
  • Students must manage their own time and complete assignments independently
  • Daily schedule is not consistent and may have large blocks of time with no classes/labs.
  • Study expectations are 2-3 hours outside of class for each hour spent in class.
  • Pursuit of inquiry and research is expected
  • Assimilation of information (notes, reading, research) is the student’s responsibility
  • Function autonomously (independence and self-sufficiency expected)